Gary Allan

Gary Allan

Cody Johnson Band, Sam Riggs & The Night People

Fri, August 29, 2014

Doors: 7:30 pm / Show: 7:30 pm (event ends at 12:00 am)

Whitewater Amphitheater

New Braunfels, TX

$31.87 - $420.28

This event is all ages

Gary Allan
Gary Allan
"I think the fans are gonna feel that this record is different," he says, "but the most important thing is that what I do is authentic. I've never pushed for a certain image. I've just always done my own thing."
This time around, Allan says, that includes letting listeners ride along through his personal landscape over the past year. "The record has taken about a year to make," he says, "and I think the whole thing reflects change. I think every record sort of reflects where I'm at, and I've made a ton of changes this year, just mentally and in how I'm approaching everything. "Oh," he adds with a grin, "and I think it's much more rockin' than anything I've done."
Allan decided to crank it up musically. "I just felt like I was growing so much and wanted the music to reflect that. I think the result has more of an edge." More edge, from the man who's already got a reputation as a bit of a Nashville outsider? "Hopefully country music feels like they need somebody like me in the fold just to shake things up," he laughs.
Not that this was all his idea - Allan feels some of the changes come from the fans themselves. "It's not like I was trying for a new direction, it's almost audience driven, too. l feel like I've got this young crowd with me now, I've got these rocker kids in my audience. And I grew up with that music, too," says the California-bred singer, "so to me that stuff is right alongside Kris Kristofferson and Waylon Jennings. The people really dictate the music, too. I feed off the audience, whatever they're really wanting is what they drag out of me. I've got the edgy side of the country crowd -- and I want to keep them."
No danger of losing them - "Living Hard" is an all-out rocker with a heavy Rolling Stones influence, and in "Like It's a Bad Thing" he lets it rip with a song that reads like a Gary Allan bad boy manifesto. "That song does sound like me, doesn't it" he says. "I think if anything that sort of renegade spirit is even more prevalent on this album. We've always danced to our own tune."
Allan, whose life is a whirlwind of hard-driving touring, also made a conscious decision to carve out more songwriting time for this album than ever before. "It's the most I've written on any album," he says. "I usually only write on my time off because I'm going so much that I hardly have time to ponder and sit around enough to want to write. Last year I sort of forced myself into it early so that I could write more for the record."
He was pleased with the result: "I'm usually more critical on my stuff," he says, "but I feel like I'm writing better, and obviously the more you've been through, the more you've got to say and the deeper you can express those emotions."
If you've been to his shows, Allan says, you know that when he sings about "baring my soul for the price of your ticket," he's not just blowing smoke. Since his last studio album, 2005's TOUGH ALL OVER, which drew on his experiences coping with the death-by-suicide of his wife, Angela, in 2004, Allan has become known for putting all his emotions on the line in his songs. "I'm exactly the same on the stage as I am off the stage," he says, "and what I found is, the bigger the arena, the more you're standing in the middle of those people, the more transparent you are. You can tell when somebody's not authentic or they're trying to be something they're not."
In songs like "Learning How to Bend," he admits he's still exploring some rough terrain as he makes his way back into everyday life and the possibility of a new relationship. "I think my favorite song that I wrote on this album is 'Learning How to Bend'," he says. "I woke up one day with that title. And it's me, you know -- I'm still learning, learning how to bend."
And in "We Touched the Sun" he moves forward while looking back at the beautiful times he shared with Angela. "There's a small circle of us that write songs together, and it's like group therapy," he says with a chuckle. "And the result is it's real. We rented a house in Costa Rica just to write, and 'We Touched the Sun' is one of the songs that came out of that session. It's a very reflective song, looking back at Angela. But it could be anybody you loved, just all the fond memories."
Thanks in part to all of that musical therapy, says Allan, these days "I'm in a good place, definitely happy."
And, he assures his fans, if you've been through tough times yourself, or you're just wondering how he's coping these days, all you have to do is listen to his music. "I don't really talk to people about my situation," he says, "but I feel like since I do write about my life and where I am, you can watch me heal through my music. It's lots easier on me, and I do hope that the music speaks to you."
With LIVING HARD, Allan is sure to find his music speaking to an ever-growing number of fans. "I want to reach even bigger audiences," he says. "I feel like I've got so much to say and so much to do right now and things are moving so fast. It's great to have something new to throw at people."
Most of all, he says, he just wants people to come along for the ride -- and hear the sounds of a life in progress. "It's a good listen, I think," he says. "I'm excited for people to hear it. It'll take you through a whole range of emotions, and I think it's going to take you on a journey. That's my goal."
Cody Johnson Band
Cody Johnson Band
In an time of synthetics and plastics, folks appreciate the real thing. Musically, we look for songs that reach beyond our eardrums, touching our hearts. Cody Johnson's unique blend of Country and Rock does just that.

Many Texas Music fans met Cody Johnson's honest style through the radio singles from his Six Strings, One Dream album: "Nobody to Blame" (#6 on the Texas music charts in 2009); #1"Pray for Rain" (2009 - 2010); and "Texas Kind of Way" (#6, late 2010 – 2011).

At first opening for other artists, Cody has also taken the Texas dance-halls by storm. Increasingly, the Cody Johnson Band is the attraction, and an honest-to-goodness one.

Cody's childhood, though, was different from his rowdy onstage personality. Growing up, home was Sebastopol, a speck on the East Texas piney woods map, the perfect setting for that country boy to roam the woods, hunt, and fish. Home-schooling and family times around the piano provided the kind of life the kind many folks envy. Even Cody's music training started when dad Carl taught him the chords to "I'll Fly Away," a Southern Gospel favorite.

Starting public school as a freshmen, Cody expanded beyond playing the guitar and drums at church. When his "ag science" teacher overheard Cody playing an original song, he convinced Cody to form a band with other FFA (Future Farmers of America) members. A few months later, Cody's band placed "runner-up" in the highly competitive Texas State FFA talent contest.

Cody left the contest realizing he was in love for life: in love with the music, the crowd, and the energy of performing onstage. Beginning in small honky-tonks and bars, he tried different musical styles. Discarding many, today Cody's shows still keep a Garth Brooks-level of energy and a Ronnie Van Zant - outlaw dedication to individual style. Like the late Chris LeDoux's musical beginnings, "CoJo" sold his acoustic CDs from the back of his truck during three years of bull-riding. Cody still shows up today as the true cowboy he is.

After graduation, Johnson worked for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice in Huntsville. There, supervising prison inmates, Cody confides, "I developed an even greater appreciation for family and friends. Seeing how easy it was to go to prison set me on the 'straight and narrow'."

Also in Huntsville, Cody met Nathan Reedy, who became his new drummer. With Carl Johnson playing bass, the trio began traveling as the Cody Johnson Band. Their first CD, Black & White Label, provided funding for travel and radio promotion - and the assurance that the music dream was real.

Along the way, several popular artists have shared their friendship, fans and wisdom with Cody. Some had business advice and warned him of issues musicians face on the road. The common thread is that other professionals respect Cody as performer, songwriter and individual. In turn, Cody Johnson earns that respect, giving as much effort to an audience of 30 or 30,000. As he states, "I like the crowd to sing along, yell, or whatever makes them feel part of the show. I love big crowds because of the energy and showmanship I can exhibit. I love acoustic shows because of the intimacy and how candid they are. Acoustic shows are like sittin' around the living room 'pickin' and grinnin'."

Winning the Texas' Regional Music Awards as "New Male Vocalist of the Year, 2011," caused Cody to choose whether leave the security of State employment to chase his dreams. So he followed his own advice to "Always pray for direction, and know that no matter what..., the good Lord has a plan."

The answer to that prayer came when Cody's wife Brandi gave her "thumbs-up." As Cody puts it, "When the woman I love - and plan to spend the rest of my life with - told me that she 'stands by her man' and believes in me 100%, I believed even more confidently that I could live my dream. Though I've had lots of people believe, contribute, push and pull me along, no one's efforts affected my decision emotionally the way Brandi's faith in me did."

Cody indeed left his "day job" for the more-than-full-time music career. But, that'swhere the story really begins.

Expanding his boundaries beyond Texas, he flew to Nashville to record a new CD with Nashville studio musicians hand-picked by his "big brother," Nashville-based fellow Texan, Trent Willmon, producer of the new album, A Different Day (released October 31,2011).

Though new to Nashville recording ways, Johnson's musical confidence showed in the Music City recording studio. Together, he and the studio musicians tweaked songs to obtain the exact intended effect. Listening to the Music City veterans, Cody adopted suggestions when they felt right, and would "hang tough" when he felt the music differently.

According to CoJo, "I don't want to be labeled as 'Texas' or 'Nashville.' I am me: Texas, outlaw, cowboy, country, and a God-fearing man using the gift He gave me."

-Billie Willmon Jenkin
Sam Riggs & The Night People
With the passion and devotion Sam Riggs and The Night People bring to the stage, it`s no wonder the Texas Country music scene is quickly making room for one of the best acts to ever sweep across the region. From Austin, Texas, Sam and his band have been working the stages and crowds since the fall of 2010, with the release of his debut EP Hairpin Trigger Heart, which garnered attention from Lonestar Music and radio stations everywhere. Equally skilled as a headlining and opening act, the band is now looking to step into the shoes of their predecessors, and the venues they perform in. Their second EP, Lighthouse was released in August 2012 with both single releases charting on the Texas Music Chart and Texas Regional Radio Report. They are now working harder than ever to develop their ever-increasing fan base, having shared the stage with the likes of Joe Diffie, Randy Rogers Band, Eli Young Band, Pat Green, Ray Wylie Hubbard, Aaron Watson, Cory Morrow, and Casey Donahew among others, Sam and his band have learned from the best and continue to build the their own original sound. With the momentum and determination that radiates from this band, combined with their hard-hitting live show and soul-searching lyrics, Sam Riggs and The Night People are steadily becoming a sound to be reckoned with in the Texas and national scene.
Venue Information:
Whitewater Amphitheater
11860 FM 306
New Braunfels, TX, 78133
http://www.whitewaterrocks.com/
BROUGHT TO YOU BY
Mike's_newlogo
cl
deep eddy
outlaw